Decrypting and analyzing HTTPS traffic without MITM

Author: dnet

Sniffing plaintext network traffic between apps and their backend APIs is an important step for pentesters to learn about how they interact. In this blog post, we’ll introduce a method to simplify getting our hands on plaintext messages sent between apps ran on our attacker-controlled devices and the API, and in case of HTTPS, shoveling these requests and responses into Burp for further analysis by combining existing tools and introducing a new plugin we developed. So our approach is less of a novel attack and more of an improvement on current techniques.

Of course, nowadays, most of these channels are secured using TLS, which provides encryption, integrity protection and authenticates one or both ends of the figurative tube. In many cases, the best method to overcome this limitation is man-in-the-middle (MITM), where a special program intercepts packets and acts as a server to the client and vice versa.

For well-written applications, this doesn’t work out-of-the-box, and it all depends on the circumstances, how many steps must be taken to weaken the security of the testing environment for this attack to work. It started with adding MITM CA certificates to OS stores, recent operating systems require more and more obscure confirmations and certificate pinning is gaining momentum. Latter can get to a point, where there’s a big cliff: either you can defeat it with automated tools like Objection or it becomes a daunting task, where you know that it’s doable but it’s frustratingly difficult to actually do it.

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