Tag Archives: Oracle

Beyond detection: exploiting blind SQL injections with Burp Collaborator

It’s been a steady trend that most of our pentest projects revolve around web applications and/or involve database backends. The former part is usually made much easier by Burp Suite, which has a built-in scanner capable of identifying (among others) injections regarding latter. However, detection is only half of the work needed to be done; a good pentester will use a SQL injection or similar database-related security hole to widen the coverage of the test (obviously within the project scope). Burp continually improves its scanning engine but provides no means to this further exploitation of these vulnerabilities, so in addition to manual testing, most pentesters use standalone tools. With the new features available since Burp Suite 1.7.09, we’ve found a way to combine the unique talents of Burp with our database exploitation framework, resulting in pretty interesting functionality.

Continue reading Beyond detection: exploiting blind SQL injections with Burp Collaborator

Testing Oracle Forms

SANS Institute accepted my GWAPT Gold Paper about testing Oracle Forms applications, the paper is now published in the Reading Room.

Forms is a typical example of proprietary technology that back in the day might have looked a good idea from business perspective but years later causes serious headaches on both the operational and security sides:

  • Forms uses naively implemented crypto with (effectively) 32-bit RC4
  • The key exchange is trivial to attack to achieve full key recovery
  • Bit-flipping is possible since no integrity checking is implemented
  • Database password set at server side is sent to all clients (you read that correctly)

And in case you’re wondering: applications based on Oracle Forms are still in use, thanks to vendor lock-in…

The full Gold Paper can be downloaded from the website of SANS Institute:

Automated Security Testing of Oracle Forms Applications

The accompanying code is available on GitHub.

The story of a pentester recruitment

Intro

Last year we decided to expand our pentest team, and we figured that offering a hands-on challenge would be a good filter for possible candidates, since we’ve accumulated quite a bit of experience from organizing wargames and CTF at various events. We provided an isolated network with three hosts and anyone could apply by submitting a name, and email address and a CV – we’ve sent VPN configuration packs to literally everyone who did so. These packs included the following message (the original was in Hungarian).

Your task is to perform a comprehensive (!) security assessment of the hosts within range 10.10.82.100-254.

Typical tasks of a professional penetration tester include

  • asking relevant clarifying questions about new projects,
  • writing the technical part of business proposals,
  • comprehensive penetration testing,
  • report writing and presentation.

That is why we decided to test the candidates’ knowledge about the above subjects. The scope of the challenge consisted of 3 servers, report writing and presentation to the technical staff with a time limit of two weeks. Here is our solution:

Continue reading The story of a pentester recruitment