Our new tool for enumerating hidden Log4Shell-affected hosts

Author: dnet

Log4Shell, formally known as CVE-2021-44228 seems to be the next big vulnerability that affects a huge number of systems, and the affected component, Log4j gets involved in logging untrusted data by design. This results in lots of vulnerable hosts that are hidden in the sense that naive testing won’t find them, as it’s not trivial to know which part of a complex parsing path (potentially involving multiple systems) is vulnerable. We built and released our new open source tool to find these in order to help everyone identify these before the bad guys do.

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Decrypting and analyzing HTTPS traffic without MITM

Author: dnet

Sniffing plaintext network traffic between apps and their backend APIs is an important step for pentesters to learn about how they interact. In this blog post, we’ll introduce a method to simplify getting our hands on plaintext messages sent between apps ran on our attacker-controlled devices and the API, and in case of HTTPS, shoveling these requests and responses into Burp for further analysis by combining existing tools and introducing a new plugin we developed. So our approach is less of a novel attack and more of an improvement on current techniques.

Of course, nowadays, most of these channels are secured using TLS, which provides encryption, integrity protection and authenticates one or both ends of the figurative tube. In many cases, the best method to overcome this limitation is man-in-the-middle (MITM), where a special program intercepts packets and acts as a server to the client and vice versa.

For well-written applications, this doesn’t work out-of-the-box, and it all depends on the circumstances, how many steps must be taken to weaken the security of the testing environment for this attack to work. It started with adding MITM CA certificates to OS stores, recent operating systems require more and more obscure confirmations and certificate pinning is gaining momentum. Latter can get to a point, where there’s a big cliff: either you can defeat it with automated tools like Objection or it becomes a daunting task, where you know that it’s doable but it’s frustratingly difficult to actually do it.

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Uninitialized Memory Disclosures in Web Applications

Author: b

While we at Silent Signal are strong believers in human creativity when it comes to finding new, or unusual vulnerabilities, we’re also constantly looking for ways to transform our experience into automated tools that can reliably and efficiently detect already known bug classes. The discovery of CVE-2019-6976 – an uninitialized memory disclosure bug in a widely used imaging library – was a particularly interesting finding to me, as it represented a lesser known class of issues in the intersection of web application and memory safety bugs, so it seemed to be a nice topic for my next GWAPT Gold Paper.

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Unix-style approach to web application testing

Author: dnet

SANS Institute accepted my GWAPT Gold Paper about Unix-style approach to web application testing, the paper is now published in the Reading Room.

The paper introduces several problems I’ve been facing while testing web applications, which converged in a common direction. Burp Suite is known by most and used by many professionals in this field, and while it’s extensible, writing such bits of software have a higher barrier of entry than the budgets of some project would allow for a one-off throwaway tool. Our solution, Piper is introduced through real-world examples to demonstrate its usage and the fact that it’s worth using it. I tried showing alternatives to each subset of the functionality to stimulate critical thinking in the minds of fellow penetration testers, since this tool is not a silver bullet either. By describing the landscape in a thorough manner, I hope everyone can learn to pick the best tool for the job, which might or might not be Piper.

The full Gold Paper can be downloaded from the website of SANS Institute:

Unix-style approach to web application testing

The accompanying code is available on GitHub. For those who prefer video content, only have 2 minutes, or find the whole idea too abstract, we made a short demonstration of the basic features below. If you’re interested in deeper internals, there’s also a longer, 45-minutes talk about it.


Patching Android apps: what could possibly go wrong

Author: dnet

Many tools are timeless: a quality screwdriver will work in ten years just as fine as yesterday. Reverse engineering tools, on the other hand need constant maintenance as the technology we try to inspect with them is a moving target. We’ll show you how just a simple exercise in Android reverse engineering resulted in three patches in an already up-to-date tool.

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Snow cannon vs. unique snowflakes — testing registration forms

Author: dnet

Many of the web application tests we conducted had a registration form in the scope. In such cases, there’s usually a field that needs to be unique for each invocation, sometimes called username, in other cases, the e-mail address is used as such. However, launching the Scanner or Intruder of Burp Suite or a similar tool will send the same username over and over again, resulting in possible false negatives. We faced this problem long enough that we came up with a solution for it, and now you can use it too!

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Not so unique snowflakes

Author: dnet

When faced with the problem of identifying entities, most people reach for incremental IDs. Since this requires a central actor to avoid duplicates and can be easily guessed, many solutions depend on UUIDs or GUIDs (universally / globally unique identifiers). However, although being unique solves the first problem, it doesn’t necessarily cover the second. We’ll present our new solution for detecting such issues in web projects in the form of an extension for Burp Suite Pro below.

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Beyond detection: exploiting blind SQL injections with Burp Collaborator

Author: dnet

It’s been a steady trend that most of our pentest projects revolve around web applications and/or involve database backends. The former part is usually made much easier by Burp Suite, which has a built-in scanner capable of identifying (among others) injections regarding latter. However, detection is only half of the work needed to be done; a good pentester will use a SQL injection or similar database-related security hole to widen the coverage of the test (obviously within the project scope). Burp continually improves its scanning engine but provides no means to this further exploitation of these vulnerabilities, so in addition to manual testing, most pentesters use standalone tools. With the new features available since Burp Suite 1.7.09, we’ve found a way to combine the unique talents of Burp with our database exploitation framework, resulting in pretty interesting functionality.

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Accessing local variables in ProGuarded Android apps

Author: dnet

Debugging applications without access to the source code always has its problems, especially with debuggers that were built with developers in mind, who obviously don’t have this restriction. In one of our Android app security projects, we had to attach a debugger to the app to step through heavily obfuscated code.

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Detecting ImageTragick with Burp Suite Pro

Author: dnet

After ImageTragick (CVE-2016–3714) was published, we immediately started thinking about detecting it with Burp, which we usually use for web application testing. Although collaborator would be a perfect fit, as image processing can happen out-of-band, there’s no official way to tap into that functionality from an extension.

The next best thing is timing, where we try to detect remote code execution by injecting the sleep command which delays execution for a specified amount of seconds. By measuring the time it takes to serve a response without and the with the injected content, the difference tells us whether the code actually got executed by the server.

We used rce1.jpg from the ImageTragick PoC collection and modified it to fit our needs. By calling System.nanoTime() before and after the requests and subtracting the values, the time it took for the server to respond could be measured precisely.

Since we already had a Burp extension for image-related issues, this was modified to include an active scan option that detects ImageTragick. The JPEG/PNG/GIF detection part was reused so that it could detect if any parameters contain images, and if so, it replaces each (one at a time) with the modified rce1.jpg payload. The code was released as v0.3 and can be downloaded either in source format (under MIT license) or a compiled JAR for easier usage. Below is an example of a successful detection:

issue screenshot

Header image © Tomas Castelazo, www.tomascastelazo.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0