Tips and scripts for reconnaissance and scanning

Author: pz

Renewal paper of my GIAC Web Application Penetration Tester certification:

Tips and scripts for reconnaissance and scanning


Uninitialized Memory Disclosures in Web Applications

Author: b

While we at Silent Signal are strong believers in human creativity when it comes to finding new, or unusual vulnerabilities, we’re also constantly looking for ways to transform our experience into automated tools that can reliably and efficiently detect already known bug classes. The discovery of CVE-2019-6976 – an uninitialized memory disclosure bug in a widely used imaging library – was a particularly interesting finding to me, as it represented a lesser known class of issues in the intersection of web application and memory safety bugs, so it seemed to be a nice topic for my next GWAPT Gold Paper.

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Unix-style approach to web application testing

Author: dnet

SANS Institute accepted my GWAPT Gold Paper about Unix-style approach to web application testing, the paper is now published in the Reading Room.

The paper introduces several problems I’ve been facing while testing web applications, which converged in a common direction. Burp Suite is known by most and used by many professionals in this field, and while it’s extensible, writing such bits of software have a higher barrier of entry than the budgets of some project would allow for a one-off throwaway tool. Our solution, Piper is introduced through real-world examples to demonstrate its usage and the fact that it’s worth using it. I tried showing alternatives to each subset of the functionality to stimulate critical thinking in the minds of fellow penetration testers, since this tool is not a silver bullet either. By describing the landscape in a thorough manner, I hope everyone can learn to pick the best tool for the job, which might or might not be Piper.

The full Gold Paper can be downloaded from the website of SANS Institute:

Unix-style approach to web application testing

The accompanying code is available on GitHub. For those who prefer video content, only have 2 minutes, or find the whole idea too abstract, we made a short demonstration of the basic features below. If you’re interested in deeper internals, there’s also a longer, 45-minutes talk about it.


The curious case of encrypted URL parameters

Author: dnet

As intra-app URLs used in web applications are generated and parsed by the same code base, there’s no external force pushing developers towards using a human-readable form of serialization. Sure, it’s easier to do debugging and development, but that’s why I used the word “external”. Many frameworks use custom encodings, but one of the most extreme things a developer can do in this regard is completely encrypting request parameters. We encountered such a setup during a recent web app security assessment, let’s see how it worked out.

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Snow cannon vs. unique snowflakes — testing registration forms

Author: dnet

Many of the web application tests we conducted had a registration form in the scope. In such cases, there’s usually a field that needs to be unique for each invocation, sometimes called username, in other cases, the e-mail address is used as such. However, launching the Scanner or Intruder of Burp Suite or a similar tool will send the same username over and over again, resulting in possible false negatives. We faced this problem long enough that we came up with a solution for it, and now you can use it too!

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Beyond detection: exploiting blind SQL injections with Burp Collaborator

Author: dnet

It’s been a steady trend that most of our pentest projects revolve around web applications and/or involve database backends. The former part is usually made much easier by Burp Suite, which has a built-in scanner capable of identifying (among others) injections regarding latter. However, detection is only half of the work needed to be done; a good pentester will use a SQL injection or similar database-related security hole to widen the coverage of the test (obviously within the project scope). Burp continually improves its scanning engine but provides no means to this further exploitation of these vulnerabilities, so in addition to manual testing, most pentesters use standalone tools. With the new features available since Burp Suite 1.7.09, we’ve found a way to combine the unique talents of Burp with our database exploitation framework, resulting in pretty interesting functionality.

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Detecting ImageTragick with Burp Suite Pro

Author: dnet

After ImageTragick (CVE-2016–3714) was published, we immediately started thinking about detecting it with Burp, which we usually use for web application testing. Although collaborator would be a perfect fit, as image processing can happen out-of-band, there’s no official way to tap into that functionality from an extension.

The next best thing is timing, where we try to detect remote code execution by injecting the sleep command which delays execution for a specified amount of seconds. By measuring the time it takes to serve a response without and the with the injected content, the difference tells us whether the code actually got executed by the server.

We used rce1.jpg from the ImageTragick PoC collection and modified it to fit our needs. By calling System.nanoTime() before and after the requests and subtracting the values, the time it took for the server to respond could be measured precisely.

Since we already had a Burp extension for image-related issues, this was modified to include an active scan option that detects ImageTragick. The JPEG/PNG/GIF detection part was reused so that it could detect if any parameters contain images, and if so, it replaces each (one at a time) with the modified rce1.jpg payload. The code was released as v0.3 and can be downloaded either in source format (under MIT license) or a compiled JAR for easier usage. Below is an example of a successful detection:

issue screenshot

Header image © Tomas Castelazo, www.tomascastelazo.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0


You’re not looking at the big picture

Author: dnet

When serving image assets, many web developers find it useful to have a feature that scales the image to a size specified in a URL parameter. After all, bandwidth is expensive, latency is killing the mobile web, and letting the frontend guys link to avatar.php?width=64&height=64 pretty straightforward and convenient. However, solutions with those latter two qualities usually have a hard time with security.

As most readers already know and/or figured it out by now, such functionality can not only be used for scaling images down but also making them huge. This usually results in hogging lots of resources on the server, including RAM (pixel buffers), CPU (image transformation algorithms) and sometimes even disk (caching, temporary files). So in most cases, this leads to Denial of Service (DoS), which affects availability but not confidentiality; however, with most issues like this, it can be combined with other techniques to escalate it further.

During our assessments, we’ve found these DoS issues in many applications, including those used in banks and other financial institutions. Even security-minded developers need to think really hard to consider such an innocent feature as something that should be handled with care. On the other hand, detecting the issue manually is not hard, however it’s something that’s easy to miss, especially if the HTTP History submodule of the Burp Suite Proxy is configured to hide image responses as visual clutter.

To solve this, we’ve developed a Burp plugin that can be loaded into Extender, and passively detects if the size of an image reply is included in the request parameters. The source code is available on GitHub under MIT license, with pre-built JAR binaries downloadable from the releases page. It currently recognizes JPEG, PNG and GIF content, and parameters are parsed using Burp’s built-in helpers.

Since dynamically generated web content often has ill-defined Content-Type values, this plugin checks if there’s at least 12 bytes of payload in the response, and if so, the first four bytes are used to decide which parser should be started for one of the three image formats above. As the plugin is only interested in the size of the image, instead of using a full-fledged parser, a simpler (and hopefully faster and more robust) built-in solution is used that tries to be liberal while parsing the image. If the dimensions of the payload could be extracted, the request is analyzed as well to get the parameters. The current version checks if both the width and the height is included in the request, and if so, the following issue is generated.

Burp finding

The plugin in its current form is quite usable, it’s passive behavior means that just by going through a site, all such image rescaling script instances will appear in the list of issues (if the default setting is used, where every request made through the proxy is fed to passive scanning). Future development might include adding an active verification component, but it’s not trivial as this class of vulnerability by design means that a well-built request might grind the whole application to a halt.

We encourage everyone to try the plugin, pull requests are welcome on GitHub!


Finding the salt with SQL inception

Author: b

Introduction

Web application penetration testing is a well researched area with proven tools and methodologies. Still, new techniques and interesting scenarios come up all the time that create new challenges even after a hundred projects.

In this case study we start with a relatively simple blind SQL injection situation and show how this issue could be exploited in a way that made remote code execution possible. The post will also serve as a reference for using Duncan, our simple framework created to facilitate blind exploitation.

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Testing Oracle Forms

Author: b

SANS Institute accepted my GWAPT Gold Paper about testing Oracle Forms applications, the paper is now published in the Reading Room.

Forms is a typical example of proprietary technology that back in the day might have looked a good idea from business perspective but years later causes serious headaches on both the operational and security sides:

  • Forms uses naively implemented crypto with (effectively) 32-bit RC4
  • The key exchange is trivial to attack to achieve full key recovery
  • Bit-flipping is possible since no integrity checking is implemented
  • Database password set at server side is sent to all clients (you read that correctly)

And in case you’re wondering: applications based on Oracle Forms are still in use, thanks to vendor lock-in…

The full Gold Paper can be downloaded from the website of SANS Institute:

Automated Security Testing of Oracle Forms Applications

The accompanying code is available on GitHub.